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dc.contributor.authorKoen, N.en
dc.contributor.authorWyatt, G.E.en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, J.K.en
dc.contributor.authorZhang, M.en
dc.contributor.authorMyer, Landonen
dc.contributor.authorZar, H.J.en
dc.contributor.authorStein, D.J.en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-02T07:02:14Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-02T07:02:14Zen
dc.date.issued2014en
dc.identifier.citationKoen N, Wyatt GE, Williams JK, Zhang M, Myer L, Zar HJ, Stein DJ. Intimate partner violence: associations with low infant birthweight in a South African birth cohort. Metab Brain Dis. 2014 Jun; 29(2):281-99. Epub 2014 Apr 12.DOI: 10.1007/s11011-014-9525-4.en
dc.identifier.issn1573-7365en
dc.identifier.pmid24729207en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11011-014-9525-4en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11288/583123en
dc.description.abstractViolence against women is a global public health problem. Exposure to intimate partner violence (IPV) during pregnancy has been associated with a number of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes, including delivery of a low birthweight (LBW) infant. However, there is a paucity of data from low-middle income countries (LMIC). We examined the association between antenatal IPV and subsequent LBW in a South African birth cohort. This study reports data from the Drakenstein Child Lung Health Study (DCLHS), a multidisciplinary birth cohort investigation of the influence of a number of antecedent risk factors on maternal and infant health outcomes over time. Pregnant women seeking antenatal care were recruited at two different primary care clinics in a low income, semi-rural area outside Cape Town, South Africa. Antenatal trauma exposure was assessed using the Childhood Trauma Questionnaire (CTQ) and an IPV assessment tool specifically designed for the purposes of this study. Potential confounding variables including maternal sociodemographics, pregnancy intention, partner support, biomedical and mental illness, substance use and psychosocial risk were also assessed. Bivariate and multiple regression analyses were performed to determine the association between IPV during pregnancy and delivery of an infant with LBW and/or low weight-for-age z (WAZ) scores. The final study sample comprised 263 mother-infant dyads. In multiple regression analyses, the model run was significant [r2  = 0.14 (adjusted r2  = 0.11, F(8, 212) = 4.16, p = 0.0001]. Exposure to physical IPV occurring during the past year was found to be significantly associated with LBW [t = -2.04, p = 0.0429] when controlling for study site (clinic), maternal height, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, substance use and childhood trauma. A significant association with decreased WAZ scores was not demonstrated. Exposure of pregnant women to IPV may impact newborn health. Further research is needed in this field to assess the relevant underlying mechanisms, to inform public health policies and to develop appropriate trauma IPV interventions for LMIC settings.en
dc.description.sponsorshipProfessor Stein is supported by the Medical Research Council of South Africa.Support for this study was provided by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (grant number OPP1017641), by the UCLA/South African Trauma Training Research (Phodiso) Program, Fogarty International (grant number 1 D43 TW007278) and by the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) Brain Disorders in the Developing World: Research Across the Lifespan program (grant number 1R21MH098662-01).en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11011-014-9525-4en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4300125/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Metabolic Brain Diseaseen
dc.subjectIntimate partner violenceen
dc.subject.meshAdolescentsen
dc.subject.meshAdultsen
dc.subject.meshChild Abuseen
dc.subject.meshCohort Studiesen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfant, low birth weighten
dc.subject.meshInfant, newbornen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshPregnancyen
dc.subject.meshSouth Africaen
dc.subject.meshSpouse abuseen
dc.subject.meshYoung adultsen
dc.titleIntimate partner violence: associations with low infant birthweight in a South African birth cohort.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalMetabolic Brain Diseaseen
dc.subject.keywordTraumaen
dc.subject.keywordPregnancyen
dc.subject.keywordLow birth weighten
dc.subject.keywordSouth Africaen
dc.research.unitAnxiety and Stress Research Uniten


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