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dc.contributor.authorGossage, J.en
dc.contributor.authorSnell, Cudoreen
dc.contributor.authorParry, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorMarais, Anna-Susanen
dc.contributor.authorBarnard, Ronelen
dc.contributor.authorde Vries, Marleneen
dc.contributor.authorBlankenship, Jasonen
dc.contributor.authorSeedat, Sorayaen
dc.contributor.authorHasken, Julieen
dc.contributor.authorMay, Philipen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-15T11:55:15Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-15T11:55:15Zen
dc.date.issued2014-07-21en
dc.identifier.citationAlcohol Use, Working Conditions, Job Benefits, and the Legacy of the “Dop” System among Farm Workers in the Western Cape Province, South Africa: Hope Despite High Levels of Risky Drinking 2014, 11 (7):7406 International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dc.identifier.issn1660-4601en
dc.identifier.doi10.3390/ijerph110707406en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11288/583942en
dc.description.abstractThis study describes alcohol consumption in five Western Cape Province communities. Cross-sectional data from a community household sample (n = 591) describe the alcohol use patterns of adult males and females, and farm workers vs. others. Data reveal that men were more likely to be current drinkers than women, 75.1% vs. 65.8% (p = 0.033); farm laborers were more likely to be current drinkers than individuals in other occupations 83.1% vs. 66.8% (p = 0.004). Group, binge drinking on weekends was the norm; men were more likely to be binge drinkers in the past week than women 59.8% vs. 48.8% (p = 0.086); farm workers were more likely to binge than others 75.0% vs. 47.5% (p < 0.001). The legacy of “Dop” contributes to current risky drinking behaviors. Farm owners or managers were interviewed on 11 farms, they described working conditions on their farms and how the legacy of “Dop” is reflected in the current use of alcohol by their workers. “Dop” was given to farm workers in the past on six of the 11 farms, but was discontinued for different reasons. There is zero tolerance for coming to work intoxicated; farm owners encourage responsible use of alcohol and assist farm workers in getting help for alcohol problems when necessary. The farm owners report some positive initiatives, were ahead of the movement to provide meaningful wages, and provide other important amenities. Further research is needed to assess whether progressive practices on some farms will reduce harmful alcohol use.en
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institute on Alcohol Abuse, and Alcoholism (NIAAA) Grants RO1 AA09440, RO1 AA11685, RO1/UO1 AA01115134, and the National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD). Protocols and consent forms were approved by: The University of New Mexico (UNM) 09-97-90-9805; UNM School of Medicine, HRRC 96-209, and 06-199; The University of Cape Town, 101/2004U; and Stellenbosch University, Faculty of Health Sciences, N06/07/129. Active consent was obtained from all participating individuals in the communities.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMDPI AG (Basel, Switzerland)en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.mdpi.com/1660-4601/11/7/7406/en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dc.subjectalcohol useen
dc.subjectabuseen
dc.subjectepidemiologyen
dc.subjectfetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD)en
dc.subjectFarm workersen
dc.subjectSouth Africaen
dc.titleAlcohol Use, Working Conditions, Job Benefits, and the Legacy of the “Dop” System among Farm Workers in the Western Cape Province, South Africa: Hope Despite High Levels of Risky Drinkingen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Environmental Research and Public Healthen
dc.research.unitAlcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug RUen
dc.date.epub2014-07en


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