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dc.contributor.authorChirwa, Paxie W.en
dc.contributor.authorMamba, Samkeloen
dc.contributor.authorManda, Samuel O.M.en
dc.contributor.authorBabalola, Folaranmi D.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-28T10:42:16Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-28T10:42:16Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07en
dc.identifier.citationAssessment of settlement models for engagement of communities in forest land under claim in Jessievale and Roburna communities in Mpumalanga, South Africa 2015, 46:65 Land Use Policyen
dc.identifier.issn02648377en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.01.021en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11288/595093en
dc.description.abstractAn estimated 40% of privately owned plantations are subject to land claims, and 70% of State-owned plantations are under claim in South Africa. The study therefore identified the settlement models for future engagement of communities in forestry with forest land under claim. In total, 231 households were purposively sampled at Jessievale (n = 100) and Roburna (n = 131) where the primary data was collected through questionnaire administered to household heads. In general, 70% of the respondents indicated that they would opt for a settlement model that involves forestry. About 27% chose joint venture model, whereas 19% chose the lease agreement model. The joint venture model was the most preferred due to its ability to transfer the land to the claimants, in addition to opportunities such as transfer of management skills, job creation and empowerment of local communities. Age and possession of forestry skills significantly (p < 0.01) contribute to the choice of the different models. While communities were interested in getting their land back, they were not fully utilising the small portions of land currently available to them for agriculture. Hence, demand for land may be driven more by other land use options such as land for expanding new homes and grazing. In conclusion, communities were still interested in forestry as a land use option. However, future forestry models should clearly address land ownership and accommodate other land use options.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank the South African Forestry Company Limited (SAFCOL) for providing funding that enabled this research to be undertaken. The cooperation of colleagues from the Komati Land Forest Company is also greatly appreciated.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0264837715000241en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Land Use Policyen
dc.rights© 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved. Notice : this is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Land Use Policy. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was subsequently published in Land Use Policy, vol. 46, pp. 65-74, 2015. doi :10.1016/j.landusepol.2015.01.021
dc.subjectBenefitsen
dc.subjectCommunitiesen
dc.subjectForest plantationsen
dc.subjectForestry modelen
dc.subjectLand claimen
dc.subjectSouth Africaen
dc.titleAssessment of settlement models for engagement of communities in forest land under claim in Jessievale and Roburna communities in Mpumalanga, South Africaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalLand Use Policyen
dc.research.unitBiostatistics Uniten
dc.date.epub2015-02-28en


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